Suicide Awareness Month

Suicide Awareness Month

I know what it’s like to feel hopeless.

For those of you who don’t know, September is Suicide Awareness Month. I regularly volunteer my time at The Honor Foundation to assist Special Forces Officers in their transition from Military to Civilian life. I council them, hear their stories, and their struggles of integrating back into society. The best thing I can do in those moments is just to listen to them, and offer support when asked. The most common thing I hear from them is that they feel hopeless.

I know what it’s like to feel Hopeless. Before starting Nourish the Brain Institute, I was 35 years old, a single mother to my 2 kids, having just left my abusive husband, and taking care of my cancer-stricken father for a few months. I took on so much stress and responsibility during that time. I woke up one morning and my body wasn’t functioning. I felt like I was walking through mud with every step I took. My body was shutting down, it had had enough. All I could do was lay there. My father, through his cancer, had to start taking care of me. The doctors had no idea what was happening to me, misdiagnosing me left and right. For a moment, I thought I would never walk again. I felt hopeless. I was forced to find my own path and recovery was slow. I slowly began to look for answers in alternative treatments and food and how food can be a medicine. Self-destructive behaviors started attacking, my mind was telling me I had brought this pain upon myself. I had to process all the years of being married to an abusive man, and the self-doubt that goes along with that. I continuously reminded myself that I had a good childhood, I had a loving family. I began a journal of my thoughts, recording how I felt on a daily basis, and the foods I ingested to the detail. I started trying 1 food at a time and journaled about it. I had to know what foods worked for me, and what didn’t. I was committed to knowing my brain. At the time, I didn’t know how much impact this decision would have on my future. Many years later, after healing myself, and doing tons of research I created the Brain & Behavior Coach Academy. I teach others this method for self-healing, and once the students complete the course, they get to go out and help others in their community. 

For those of you who don’t know, September is Suicide Awareness Month. I regularly volunteer my time at The Honor Foundation to assist Special Forces Officers in their transition from Military to Civilian life. I council them, hear their stories, and their struggles of integrating back into society. The best thing I can do in those moments is just to listen to them, and offer support when asked. The most common thing I hear from them is that they feel hopeless. The feeling of hopelessness comes from a lack of purpose in one’s life. I feel so honored to offer them reflections of hope and that they do still have a purpose here on this planet. 

However, I want to offer them more. I want to offer them tools to support their Brain & Behaviors before they exit the military. I want to create safe places for support when they are having suicidal thoughts. I want to teach them how to help their brothers in the military. I can’t do this alone. Dear reader, I need your support. Please follow the link to sign my petition. We are looking for 100,000 signatures to demand better care for Special Operations Officers of the US Military. We want to make the Government take responsibility for educating and giving them tools to address their brain & behavioral health while in duty and to prevent suicide after retirement. 

Listen to this week’s Make it Brain podcast episode #8: Sugar Converging to Procrastination. Listen now on Spotify and Apple Podcast.

 

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